WHO ME, SUPERSTITIOUS?

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When I first became a
baseball PR man, I was told in no uncertain terms that this is a sport of
superstition.  Streaks ran hot and
streaks ran cold for teams and players, and there was no logical explanation
for either. It’s kind of like those isolated villages in the backlands of
Africa or Brazil
you see on PBS programs.  The natives
seem to always be worshiping some god that controls various factors of their
existence.  The Sun God.  The Rain God.  The Good
Harvest
God.  Well, while it goes
against my own personal faith, there are fully grown men who absolutely believe
there is a Baseball God.  They claim there’s no other way to
explain why line drives that hit the chalk line one day will just as likely
curve foul by two inches the next.  Or that that same on-the-black slider that
was called a strike in New York might be
called a ball in Detroit.
 Or why an opponent arrives in town mired
in an eight-game losing streak of epic proportions and for no good reason, can
inexplicably channel the 1927 Yankees for one series and sweep your team!  In fact, just over the weekend, that actually
did happen when the Baltimore
Orioles–yes, those Baltimore
Orioles–rode a rare wave to sweep the big, bad Boston Red Sox in a three-game
series. 

 

And closer to home, as you
know, our Fightin’ A’s limp home after a nightmarish 1-5 road trip that saw the
Rays and Blue Jays spew forth 14 home runs and 46 runs against a pitching staff
that had left Oakland only seven days earlier with a quite exquisite 2.93 ERA.  Of course, some of it can be explained by
injuries, as we lost one starting pitcher to the DL (Brett Anderson) and may
lose another one (Justin Duchscherer) if medical tests today reveal anything
serious.  And Kurt Suzuki–unquestionably
the team’s MVP last season–joined the A’s DL-bound wounded when his back was
slow to respond to treatment last week. 

 

So can you really wonder why
baseball players and fans are superstitious?  Of course, I think such thoughts are rather
silly.  But to be safe, bring all your charms
and good luck pieces–heck, wear garlic
necklaces–
to the Coliseum this week to ward off any evil spirits that could derail a winning homestand.  It’s time to get the green-and-gold mojo back and let those Rangers and Rays
take turns at trying to explain the unexplainable.  Not that I’m superstitious or anything.    

3 Comments

Of course there’s a baseball god. Every good fan knows that!!!
And yes, we’ll bring the whole trunk full of good luck charms.

Of course there’s a baseball god. Every good fan knows that!!!
And yes, we’ll bring a truck full of good luck charms. See you at the ballpark.

Bob,

When things calm down a little, it would be great to get a behind the scenes look at your week after the Perfect Game!

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